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Turtle Mountain Star
Rolla , North Dakota
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June 2, 2014     Turtle Mountain Star
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June 2, 2014
 

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Page 8 The Star June 2, 2014 Pictured, from left to right, are Benjamin Dubois, Autumn Eller, Lee Houle, Chase Wilkie and Hayden Azure. Kindergarten students earn classroom accolades Benjamin Dubois is in Ms. Azure and Mrs. Demery's kindergarten classroom at Turtle Mountain Ele- mentary School. Benjamin's favorite color is blue and his favorite animals are horses. He likes to eat macaroni soup and his favorite books are about horses. Benjamin likes to learn at school and he likes to play with his iPad at home. He is special because he is named after his uncle and he helps others by being friendly. When he grows up he wants to be in the army. Benjamin is the son of Re- becca Dubois and Harvey Peltier Jr. The student of the week in Lor- raine Gourneau and Merlin Pays' kindergarten classroom is Autumn Eller. Autumn is six years old. Her favorite color is pink. Her favorite food is bananas. Her favorite animal is a horse. Her favorite thing to do at home is play outside, and at school she likes to sing the ABCs. Her fa= vorite toy is a choo-choo train. Her favorite place to go is the zoo. When Autumn gr0w  up she would like to Her favorite book is "A Cow Jumped Over the Moon". She is special be- cause she laughs. Autumn is the daughter of Krenda and Kevin EUer. The student of the week in Lor- raine Gourneau and Merlin Pays' kindergarten classroom is Lee Houle. Lee is six years old. His favorite color is green. He likes to eat ham- burgers. His favorite animal is a horse. His favorite thing to do at home is play games. His favorite thing to do at school is to do his work. Lee's favorite toy is a monster truck. His favorite place to go is the store. Three super-cool facts about him are that he is nice, he is funny and he likes to play with cars. When he grows up he wants to be a derby driver. Lee's favorite song is "Old MacDonald". His favorite movie is "Shrek". Lee's favorite book is "About Dinosaurs". Lee is special because he is friendly. Lee Houle is the son of Waylon and Tanya Houle. Student of the week in William Houle and Delilah Martin's kinder- movie is "The Amazing Spiderman". When he is relaxing at home he likes his coloring books and playing with his Ninja Turtle toys. His favorite thing to do at school is play with all of his friends. His favorite book is "Disney Planes". His favorite place to visit is his Grandma Cecelia's home. He is special because he is smart and lovable. He is the son of Shannon PlainBull and Shane Azure. Rolette Community Care Center Josephine Poitra, Ronnie Phillipp, Gary Mattson, Rita LaFloe, Velma Millang, Vivian Poitra, Robert Lafloe, Bradley "Scott" Herman, Emma Gunville, Rita McCormack and Albert Lagasse. Above list includes those residents Chase's favorite foods are potato salad, yogurt, tacos and pizza. His favorite color is blue. Chase's fa- vorite books are "Spiderman" and any book about sharks. His favorite movies are "Sponge Bob," and "The Fast and Furious 2". "Jingle Bells" is Chase's favorite song. While at home, he likes to play outside with his dog, ride his bike and play with his PS3 and Wii games. When at school, Chase likes to play at the school playground and read books. His favorite subject in school is math. Chase wants to be a helicopter pilot when he grows up. He is special because he wears a cool cap. Chase is a super-cool guy because he can drive a 4-wheeler and he has a fast bike. Chase is the son of Ivy and Jesse Wilkie. The student of the week in Shelly Peltier and Karen Zaste's kinder- garten classroom is Hayden Azure. Hayden is six years old. He likes who allow their names to be pub- green Jell-O and his favorite colbr : ' lished, Listcompiled as of March 27. : red.He likes giraffes andwarlts.to):' .... i -,r, i i ' i'""l i i ...... i ,+,+,v,i ll,I : Rolette County senior meals ROLETTE Home-delivered meals are served Monday through Friday. Congregate meals are served Monday, Wednes- day and Friday. Monday, June. 2: Meat loaf, mashed potatoes with gravy, cream style corn, gingerbread. Tuesday, June 3: BBQ spare ribs, boiled potatoes, cabbage, cherry crisp. Wednesday, June 4: Swiss steak, mashed potatoes with gravy, mixed vegetables, fruit. Thursday, June 5: Chicken breast in gravy, rice pilaf, broccoli, peaches. Friday, June 6: Tater tot hotdish, broccoli, fruit. Monday, June 9: Roast beef, mashed potatoes with gravy, wax beans, sherbet. DUNSEITH Dunseith - Home-delivered and congregate meals are served Monday through Friday. Monday, June 2: Cranberry glazed chicken, potato salad, beets, parsley sprig garnish, mandarin orange gela- tin. Tuesday June 3: Breaded had- dock, escalloped potatoes, beets, parsley sprig garnish, lemon fruit salad. Wednesday, June 4: Meatballs in tomato sauce, parslied potatoes, mixed vegetables, peach on lettuce leaf, rhubarb custard cake. Thursday, June 5: New England boiled dinner, boiled potatoes, car- rots, tomato slice garnish, blueberry cup. Friday, June 6: Hot pork commer- cial, whipped potatoes, green and gold beans, carrot raisin salad, pears. Monday, June 9: Glazed chicken, parslied potatoes, oriental blend veg- etables, spiced apple ring garnish, fresh grapes. ROLLA Home-delivered and congregate meals are served Monday through Friday. Monday, June 2: Cranberry glazed chicken, potato salad, beets, parsley sprig garnish, mandarin orange gela- tin. Tuesday, June 3: Breaded had- dock, escalloped potatoes, beets, parsley sprig garnish, lemon fruit salad. Wednesday, June 4: Meatballs in tomato sauce, parslied potatoes, mixed vegetables, peach on lettuce leaf, rhubarb custard cake. Thursday, June 5: New England boiled dinner, boiled potatoes, car- rots, tomato slice garnish, blueberry cup. Friday, June 6: Hot pork commer- cial, whipped potatoes, green and gold beans, carrot raisin salad, pears. Monday, June 9: Glazed chicken, parslied potatoes, oriental blend veg- etables, spiced apple ring garnish, fresh grapes. ST. JOHN Home-delivered meals are served Monday, Tuesday and Thursday at the Senior Citizen Center. Monday, June 2: Cranberry glazed chicken, potato salad, beets, parsley sprig garnish, mandarin orange gela- tin. Tuesday, June 3: Breaded had- dock, escalloped potatoes, beets, parsley sprig garnish, lemon fruit salad. Thursday, June 5: New England boiled dinner, boiled potatoes, car- rots, tomato slice garnish, blueberry cup. Monday, June 9: Glazed chicken, parslied potatoes, oriental blend veg- etables, spiced apple ring garnish, fresh grapes. i i Come help celebrate Richard and Carol Bonn's 50th anniversary/ Saturday, June 7 2 to 5 p.m. at the Bisbee Hall i J i ....... ' ..... ! !!l be -cgp. Three super-cool facts about her are she laughs, she's nice and she's smart. Her favorite song is "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star". Her favorite movie is "See Spot Run". Potucek Potucek joins BCBS office in Grand :. 00rKS Maureen Potucek has rejoined the Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Dakota (BCBSND) office in Grand Forks in a new position of health benefits consultant. Her primary re- sponsibilities include individual health insurance sales and retention. Potucek joined BCBSND in 2000 as a claims representative in Fargo and was promoted to marketing spe- cialist in the Grand Forks office in 2006. She brings 30 years of experience in management and billing-related positions in the health care industry in North Dakota and Minnesota. She is the daughter of Jerry Me- Cloud and Patsy McCloud. Potucek grew up in Rolla and attended North Dakota State University in Fargo and Northland Technical College in East Grand Forks. Subscribe to The Star! Call us toll-free 866-476-5253 for more details! .'4-" garten classroom is Chase Wilkie. acop when he grows up. His favorite o tgommunlty tffupper Monday, June 9 5,7 p.m. at the Rolette Memorial Hall Served by Rolette Dollars for Scholars. Take-outs available at 5:30 p.m. Call 477-4771 ,, Sw'geon General's report: Tobacco causes addi- tional diseases, unnecessary death. Smoking has caused an enormous avoidable public health tragedy with almost 500,000 Americans dying every year due to cigarettes, according the 2014 Surgeon General's Report. Unless efforts like smoke-free policies and well- funded tobacco cessation programs are bolstered, 5.6 mil- lion young Americans who are alive today will die from smoking, according to Acting Surgeon General Rear Ad- miral Boris Lushniak. In the last 50 years, the smoking rate in the United States has been cut from nearly 43 percent in 1965 to 18 percent in 2012. But since the first Surgeon General's re- port in 1964, more than 20 million premature deaths can be attributed to cigarette smoking. About 7.8 million of those deaths were due to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, the report said. "Over the last 50 years, more than 20 million Amer- icans could have lived healthier and longer lives if they had never lit their first cigarette," said Nancy Brown, chief executive officer of the American Heart Associa- tion. Even more disturbing is the fact that every one of these deaths was entirely preventable. "The evidence that smbking kills is now even more overwhelming and undeniable. We must take the bold and urgent actions necessary to wipe out the curse of tobacco forever." The report, which is the most recent of 30 issues on tobacco and smoking, adds to the list of health problems that are associated with smoking, including liver cancer and colorectal cancer. It stated that smoking causes Type 2 diabetes mellitus, age-related macul degeneration, erectile dysfunction and rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the report said that smoking can impact the immune sys- tem and worsen asthma, while secondhand smoke expo- sure can cause strokes. "The conclusions from these reports have evolved from a few casual associations in 1964 to a robust body of evidence documenting health consequences both from active smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke across a range of diseases and organ systems," Lushniak wrote. "A half century after the release of the first report, we continue to add to the 10ng list of diseases causes by to- bacco and exposure." Data from the past 50 years shows the loss of life and the economic impact that have stemmed from manu- facturing, marketing, selling and consuming tobacco, ac- cording to the report. Nearly .25 trillion cigarettes have been consumed in this half-century, despite a significant drop in consumption per smoker; Lushniak wrote. Smoking costs between $289 billion and $333 bil- lion a year in the U.S.. That includes at least $130 billion in direct medical care of adults, over $150 billion for lost productivity due to premature death and more than $5 bil- lion for lost productivity from premature death due to ex- posure to secondhand smoke. The report points out that being in the same room with a smoker can cause irreparable harm. Two and half of those who died in the last 50 yeals were non-smokers exposed to secondhand smoke. Ongoing exposure, ac- cording to the report, can increase your risk of stroke by 20 to 30 percent. The report also examines strategies that could erad-' icate the death and disease from tobacco. Smoke-free policies can result in a reduction of coronary events in people younger than 65. In addition, smokers who quit by age 40 can virtually eliminate their risk of heart dis- ease, according to the report. Brown, who attended the news conference, said the new information boosts efforts to pass smoke-free laws in all 50 states and increase resources to help people quit smoking. "It is shocking how little we employ the solutions that can help us avert more unnecessary deaths and end this epidemic once and for all," Brown said. "Combined interventions-such as mass media campaigns, well- funded state prevention and cessation programs, in- creased tobacco taxes, and smoke-free laws-reduce tobacco use among youth and adults The association strongly supports all of these interventions." For more information, please visit http://blog.heart.org/surge0n-generals-report-tobacco- causes-additional-diseases-unnecessary-death/. The report urges learning important lessons from other successes in confronting epidemics like smallpox and polio with public health strategies that were sustained for decades. Smallpox was eradicated and polls is on the verge of elimination. The report urges a commitment to creating a society free of tobacco-related death and dis- ease "by engaging all sectors of society to an equally sin- gle-minded focus." If you have any questions, please contact Rolette County Public Health at 477-5646. T, llesdy rCeddaneSsCaayy Tursd.ay ]rjqlay luesoay InU',soaY r rmay \\; Isolated T-storms Scat'd T-storms nn Bck + . . . tsmarcK.. BQtuneau .... Bo i .. D17... D6',7i1 LaKe u on ... _t,son.. P O ....... JamUresloanawr n.rK, s _ jamestown. 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I I 2il33114115  1 9 I01 +11 -:  --:: . ::  ee www.WhatsOurWeather.com Wsatl Tiia t ol r, ure @etaSy@rnadoes? oa -  aouo e s y 'qeaDOlAI :iit'ffV We offer: (ropland Genetics InVigor Seed Aeration Equipment& Fans Westeel Grain Bins Cash Discount & Volume Rebate Rolla Coop Grain 477-5612 Color reprints now available at the Turtle Mountain Star! Your favorite sports photos! Your favorite feature photos! Your favorite any-time photos! Stop by or call The Star 477-6495