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June 23, 2014     Turtle Mountain Star
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June 23, 2014
 

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Page 8 The Star June 23, 2014 NDSU will North Dakota State University (NDSU) received funding to estab- lish a public health resource center for American Indians in North Dakota and the upper Midwest. The center's mission is to address in- equalities in American Indian health status by increasing access to public health resources. The announcement was made at a June 18 news confer- ence at NDSU. The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust provided a three-year grant of more than $1.4 million and the North Dakota Higher Education Challenge Fund provided a match of more than $720,000 to start the American Indian Public Health Resource Center. The center will be part of NDSU's Master of Public Health program, the only pro- gram in the country with an Ameri- can Indian specialization. "The American Indian population in the Northern Plains has some of the worst health disparities in the na- tion," said Donald Warne, director of the Master of Public Health program and the new center. "Most of these health disparities are preventable, so the role of public health is essential." The general population, on aver- age, is healthier and lives longer than the Amelican Indian population. American Indians have twice the prevalence of diabetes and nearly six times the mortality rate from the dis- ease. In North Dakota, average age at death is 75.7 years for the general population and 54.7 years for Amer- ican Indians. "We have many unmet needs in regard to healthcare," said Phyllis Young, a member of the Standing Rock Tribal Council's Health, Edu- cation and Welfare Committee. "We see this as an opportunity to address some of our health issues and con- cerns in our tribal communities. The American Indian Public Health Re- source Center will provide the op- portunity to bring in much needed in to inequalities in American Indian health status Donald Warne, director of the Master of Public Health program at NDSU, announces the estab- lishment of an American Indian Public Health Resource Center. Joining him from left to right are NDSU President Dean L. Bresciani; Scott Davis, executive director of the North Dakota Indian Af- fairs Commission; and Shelley Stingley, program director for the Helmsley Charitable Trust's Rural Healthcare Program. resources. We look forward to our will include expanding the American and refine existing policies as well as expanding partnership with NDSU." Indian public health workforce by coordinate policies and data-sharing The center will work to improve working with tribal colleges to de- agreements with state health depart- American Indian health and mortal- velop public health training pro- ments, local public health agencies, ity rates through: grams and build bridge programs to Medicare and Medicaid. Public health services and pro- the Master of Public Health program "Establishing the resource center gramming. This includes health pro- and the American Indian Public will help provide technical assistance motion and disease prevention, such Health Graduate Certificate Program. to tribal communities in the upper as tobacco cessation, as well as tech- It also will include developing health Midwest such as managing their own nical assistance with community education materials for a variety of health systems and operations," said health needs assessments, public audiences, including community Shelley Stingley, program director health strategic planning, grant writ- members, the public health work- for the Helmsley Charitable Trust's ing and other assessments, force, tribal leaders and other stake- Rural Healthcare Program. "Through Public health research. Research holders, health care self-determination, they will follow a model where the tribes Public health policy. As sover- will have a better chanCe to improve determine research priorities -- a shift eign nations, tribes can develop their disparate health outcomes." from a researcher-driven model, health policies. The center will work Warne will serve as director of the Public health education. This with tribes to develop new policies center. He is a member of the Oglala I ROLETTE ST. JOHN Tuesday, June 24: Fishwich on Home-delivered meals are served Home-delivered meals are served bun, potato au gratin, fresh sliced Monday through Friday. Congregate Monday, Tuesday and Thursday at tomatoes, parsley sprig garnish, meals are served Monday, Wednes-the Senior Citizen Center. melon balls. day and Friday. Monday, June 23: Meat loaf, Thursday, June 26: Pork roast, Monday.June 23: Salisbury steak,whipped potatoes ith gravy, c ots, whipped potatoes with gravy, wax baked ~,~arrb~s~"banana c~e. parsl'~.~ ~'1~ ~'fSIl~ fl~n~arm or- beans, beet pickle garnish, lemon Tuesaay, June 24: Tangy baked ange banana cup. fruit gelatin. chicken, scalloped potatoes, peas, ice cream. Wednesday, June 25: Turkey and dressing, mashed potatoes, green beans, fruit. Thursday, June 26: Lasagna, gar- lic toast, corn, strawberry delight. Friday, June 27: Baked ham or cod, creamed potatoes, peas and car- rots, fruit. Monday, June 30: Fried chicken, mashed potatoes with gravy, broccoli Normandy, pie. Monday, June 30: Oven fried chicken, baked potato with sour cream, carrots, spiced apple ring gar- nish, pineapple. Lakota tribe from Pine Ridge, South can be addressed early on through Dakota, and is the only American In- quality research, programming, pol- dian Master of Public Health direc- icy and ultimately work in tribal tor in the country, communities," said Scott Davis, ex- The center will employ up to 10 ecutive director of the North Dakota people, including an operational Indian Affairs Commission. "The manager responsibleforleadingday- center will provide our regional to-day work, project managers, sup- Tribal Nations a huge needed re- port staff and graduate assistants, source in combating those health The center will provide hands-on challenges for today and tomorrow. experiences for NDSU public health It is definitely a game changer." graduate students and tribal college NDSU is recognized as one of the students through assistantships, in- nation's top 108 public and private ternships, student projects and other universities by the Carnegie Com- activities, mission on Higher Education. Petra Reyna One Hawk, a mem- The Helmsley Charitable Trust as- ber of the Standing Rock Sioux pires to improve lives by supporting Tribe and a student in the Master of effective nonprofits in a variety of se- Public Health program, will work at lected areas. Since 2008, when the the center through a graduate assist- Trust began its active grantmaking, it antship. "I know firsthand some of has committed more than $1 billion the struggles we have on the reser- to a wide range of charitable organi- vation," she said. "In our family, we zations. have always believed in education, The Trust's Rural Healthcare Pro- so I see this as an opportunity to gram funds innovative projects that learn and to achieve some of the use information technologies to con- goals others and I have for our com- nect rural patients to emergency munities to overcome some of those medical care, bring the latest medical struggles." therapies to patients in remote areas A committee of representatives and provide state-of-the-art training from each of the four tribes in North for rural hospitals and EMS person- Dakota and the National Indian nel. Health Board will advise the center. To date, this program has awarded The advisory committee will ensure more than $217 million to organiza- center activities respond appropri- tions and initiatives in the upper Mid- ately to the public health needs of west states of North Dakota, South tribal communities and identify op- Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming, Min- portunities for future activities, nesota, Iowa and Montana. For more "Many of the health challenges information on the Trust and its pro- Tribal Nations in North Dakota face grams, visit www.helmsleytrust.org. How good is your breathing? .... Smoking causes chronic ob- Do you breathe easy? structive pulmonary disease, or Do you tire easily? COPD. There is no cure. People Are you a smoker? with COPD slowly die from lack of Every cigarette you smoke dam- air. COPD includes the diseases ages your breathing. New research emphysema and chronic bronchitis. shows that poisons in tobacco Emphysema causes the walls smoke harm your body from the between the air sacs in your lungs moment they enter to lose their ability to your mouth. They at- stretch and shrink back. tack the inner tissue on The air sacs become the way to your lungs, weaker and wider. Air The first time you gets trapped in your smoke, your lungs may Publteltt tlthlungs. You have trouble feel like they are bum- .................. ....... breathing in oxygen and ing. You may cough vi- breathing out carbon olently. That's your body telling dioxide. If you keep smoking, nor- you it is being poisoned, real breathing may become harder Tiny, brush-like cilia line your as emphysema develops. With era- airways. They sweep out mucus physema, lung tissue is destroyed, and dirt so your lungs stay clear, making it very hard to get enough Over time, smoking damages and oxygen. destroys these brushes. You get Chronic bronchitis is the "smokers' cough" because your swelling of the lining of your body makes more mucus and the bronchial tubes. When this hap- cilia can no longer clear your lungs, pens, you have less air flow to and Other damage is happening, too. from your lungs. You cough up When you quit smoking, you heavy mucus with chronic bronchi- will cough and wheeze less. You tis. will cough up less mucus. After a Pneumonia and respiratory few smoke-free months, you will problems are far more common in breathe easier, smokers. For people with asthma, Your lungs should be elastic like even breathing someone else's a balloon. They expand when you smoke can trigger a severe attack. breathe in and compress when you Your airways become inflamed and breathe out. The poisons in tobacco tight. It's hard to breathe. ( A report smoke inflame the delicate lining of the Surgeon General "How to- of your lungs. Years of smoking bacco smoke causes disease" CDC) can damage your lungs so much If you have any questions or that they no longer stretch and ex- concerns please call Rolette County change air. Public Health 477-5646. The Biannual School/Community Meeting for the Rolla Public School District will be held Wednesday June 25, at 7:00 p.m. in the old commons I I III III IIII .................... III IIIII IIIII Ii Illl Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Mosll3 %umlx Mostl3 Stlltn~Partly Cloud~ Itigh: 71) Imv: 53 tliph: 73 low: 56 lligh: 71 I,ow: 55 Regional Temperatures Mostly Sunny Mostl? Stlllll} Mostl3 Sunn~ I'artly Cloud) Iligh: 75 I,ow: 51 High: 75 I,o~v: 54 Itigh: 72 I~o~': 5(1 Iligh: 71 1,ow-.52 North Dakota South Dakota Tuesday "~ edncsda) Tuesday Wednesday ('it_. ,,,, ~W'x ~Wx ~ ~W__.~x Hi/LoWx Bismarck ..... 75 55s 7758 s Aberdeen 76~57s 77/58s Bo|fincau ..... 72'54t 75'57s Rapid City,., ,74/57 s 76/60s Devils I,akc...71'55 s 73/58s Sioux Falls ...77/59 s 78/60s Dickinson .... 7654 s 77/57s Montana l'argo ........ 7556 pc 76'59s (h'and Forks . .73'55 s 7558 s Billings ...... 80/56 t 81/55 t Jameslox~,n .... 74;55s 7658 s Minnesota Minor ........ 73 55s 76'58s Duluth ....... 69/52 pc 69/53 s Rugb3 ....... 72,54s 76,57s Minneapolis...76/59 t 77/~1 pc Viltislon ..... 7656 s 8058 s Manitoba, Canada ~,eaHIt, r {~&x): C[,~.?lt}ud)'~ fl/flurries; P, randon ...... 71/47pc 77/53pc pC pl]r[I) cloud}: ]lll:'tllObll) c~,itd~: r, rain; rsrd~,re. ~,m~: s~tmm; shshoac~s Killarne5 ..... 64/54t 6152 pc snsnow:lrhunde,'stornls Winnipeg ..... 71/52pc 77/55pc Friday Saturdu~ Sunda~ DUNSEITH Home-delivered and congregate meals are served Monday through Friday. Monday, June 23: Meat loaf, whipped potatoes with gravy, carrots, parsley sprig garnish, mandarin or- ange banana cup. Tuesday, June 24: Fishwich on bun, potato au gratin, fresh sliced tomatoes, parsley sprig garnish, melon balls. Wednesday, June 25: Chicken al- fredo, green peas, Romaine salad with dressing, tomato slice garnish, fresh banana. Thursday, June 26: Pork roast, whipped potatoes with gravy, wax beans, beet pickle garnish, lemon fruit gelatin. Friday, June 27: Swiss steak, parslied potatoes, asparagus cuts, peach on lettuce leaf, assorted fruit pie. Monday, June 30: Oven fried ,chicken, baked potato with sour / cream, carrots, spiced apple ring gar- nish, pineapple. ROLLA Home-delivered and congregate meals are served Monday through Friday. Monday, June 23: Meat loaf, whipped potatoes with gravy, carrots, parsley sprig garnish, mandarin or- ange banana cup. Tuesday, June 24: Fishwich on bun, potato au gratin, fresh sliced tomatoes, parsley sprig garnish, melon balls. Wednesday, June 25: Chicken al- fredo, green peas, Romaine salad with dressing, tomato slice garnish, fresh banana. Thursday, June 26: Pork roast, whipped potatoes with gravy, wax beans, beet pickle garnish, lemon fruit gelatin. Friday, June 27: Swiss steak, parslied potatoes, asparagus cuts, peach on lettuce leaf, fruit pie. Monday, June 30: Oven fried chicken, baked potato with sour cream, carrots, spiced apple ring gar- nish, pineapple. Sun and Moon 5:35 a.m. 9:46 p.m.3:55 a.m. 7:17 p.m ..... 5:36 a,m. 9:46 p.m.4:37 a.m. 8:12 l~.rn. I:ull 5:36 a.m. 9:46 p.m.5:25 a.m. 9:00 p.m. 7/12 5:37 a.m. 9:46 p.m.6:17 a.m. 9:42 p.nl.. 5:37 a,m. 9:46 p,nt. 7:[3 a.m. 10:19 p.m. 5:38 a,m. 9:45 p.m.8:11 a.m. 10:50 p.m. 5:3') a.m, 9:45 pall, 9:11 a.ln. ] l :18 p.m, I,ast 7.,'18 First Monda} 7/5 Call us for delivery of your --- Farm Fuel! Bulk Diesel, Gasoline, Ethanol, Propane, LP Tanks for sale, Wheel Alignments, LP Heaters, Tires, Service Shop Trust Your Online Security to SecureIT Plus from United Telephone Mutual Aid V' Guaranteed Protection v' Professional Installation t/Montly Email Reporting v' Parental Control Order TODAY! 800-844-9708 256-5156 In-Depth I,ocal Forecast loday we will see mostly sunny skies with a high temperature of 70, humidity of 46%. The record high temperature lor toda3 is 94 set in 1961. l!xpect partly cloud~ skies tonight with an overnight low of 5Y', lhe record low for tonight is 39'~ set in 1986. Wednesday, skies will be mostly sunny uith a high temperature of 73". humidity of 53%. Skies will be partly cloudy Wednesday night with an overnight Io~ of 56", Local UV Index 10-2131415 f~1:71 8191~01 li+ I UV Index 0-2: I,ow, 3-5: Moderate, 6-7: Iligh, 8-10: Ve~3 l ligh, I I ~: Extreme Exposure Weather Trivia ll'7tat i.~ Iht" I:uiila Scale?9 saopeu.lol .|o tll,~u&lls pul~ p,~,~ds pu!~x 3tll s,~.msl;.~ttt ~lC,~g s!tU. :/'Y"~'gll~ We offer: Cropland Genetics InVlgor Seed Aeration Equipment & Fans Westeel Grain Bins Cash Discount & Volume Rebate Rolla Coiop Grain 477-5612 Color reprints now available at the Turtle Mountain Star! Your favorite sports photos! Your favorite feature photos! Your favorite any-time photos! Stop by or call The Star